Twine Workshop

Links

The most basic (and most useful) feature of Twine is creating links. In order to create a link, surround your text with double brackets, [[like this]].

Do you want to go [[left]] or [[right]]?

This will create a passage called left and right, respectively.

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 11.31.26 AM.png

Links, with hidden names

Let’s say you want to hide the names of the passage you are linking to (maybe you don’t want a player to know he or she is going to a passage called Dragon Attack, for example).

You could have the left choice lead to a passage where the player is attacked by a dragon, and right lead to a place where the player is not attacked by a dragon. Simply use an arrow, like this:

[[left->DragonAttack]]

[[right->NoDragon]]

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 11.36.27 AM

 

This is really all you need to get started! You can create fun, compelling, thoughtful games and stories using just this structure. I recommend focusing on using these for today.

If you’re interested in more advanced features, you may want to check out the official guide or take a look at the forums and search for the topic you’re interested in. I’ve also outlined two features below, images and if-then statements.

Two advanced features

Images

Putting images in your stories can be really fun, and it’s pretty easy. To link to an existing image, you simply need to use this:

<img src=”IMAGEURL”>

Where “IMAGEURL” is the URL of the image you want to link to, for example:

<img src=”https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0f/Grosser_Panda.JPG/1024px-Grosser_Panda.JPG“>

You can adjust the number in the width and height to change the size of your image, or add alt text, using this:

<img src=”https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0f/Grosser_Panda.JPG/1024px-Grosser_Panda.JPG” width=”500″ height=”300″ alt=”Panda”>

If-Then Statements

You can use if-then statements for a number of features. You can introduce a variable (for example, if they player has found an item such as a key) then check for that variable (if the player has found a key, open the door).

This forum post is a succinct guide. Beyond that, an example:

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 11.52.30 AM

The main things to note here are

Setting the key: 

You look around a find a key.

(set: $key to true)

You can go back to the [[start]]!

Checking for the key:

This door is locked and you need a key.

(if: $key is true)[You open the door! Go to the [[next room]]].
(else:)[The door is locked. You need a key.]

Other stuff to look at:

The official documentation: http://twine2.neocities.org/

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